Quality Data - Heart Attack

What is a Heart Attack?
A heart attack (also called an AMI or acute myocardial infarction) occurs when an area of heart muscle dies or is permanently damaged because of an inadequate supply of oxygen to that area.

How is Care Measured?
When someone is having a Heart Attack, timely, clear-cut treatment is critical. Evidence has shown that patients who received specific treatments and medications at certain times experienced the best outcomes. The procedures and medications include:

  • Aspirin at arrival;
  • Aspirin at discharge
  • ACE Inhibitor or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)
  • Fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes of arrival
  • PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) within 90 minutes of arrival
  • Smoking cessation advice/counseling
  • Statin prescribed at discharge (new measure October 2010)

Brief Explanation:

  • Aspirin can help keep blood clots from forming and dissolve blood clots that can cause heart attacks.
  • Taking aspirin may help prevent further heart attacks.
  • Beta blockers are a type of medicine used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain (angina) and heart failure and to help prevent a heart attack.
  • Blood clots can cause heart attacks. Doctors may give fibrinolytic medication or perform a procedure to open the blockage, and in some cases, may do both.
  • The procedures called Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI) are among those that are the most effective for opening blocked blood vessels that cause heart attacks. Doctors may perform PCI, or give medicine to open the blockage, and in some cases may do both.
  • Smoking is linked to heart attacks. Quitting may help prevent another heart attack.

Hays Medical Center either exceeds the national average or matches 100% of Heart Attack care standards achieved by the nation's top hospitals.
 

Heart Attack (AMI) 4th Quarter 2013
Hays Medical Center Process of Care Measures Percentage for HaysMed Kansas Average National Average
Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Aspirin at Arrival 100 99 99
Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Aspirin at Discharge 100 99 99
Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Ace Inhibitor or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD) 100 98 98
Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Beta Blocker at Discharge 100 97 97